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Sparky Prime
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Re: Star Trek

Post by Sparky Prime »

Shockwave wrote:
Fri Nov 27, 2020 1:20 pm
Yeah, you're not wrong about that and in thinking about it, it actually does kind of overshadow the whole film (at least for me). Because the whole time I'm watching CADET Kirk throughout the movie, I'm wondering when or how enough time in the movie is going to elapse for it to make sense for us to be watching CAPTAIN Kirk by the end of it. And unfortunately, it never happens, he just magically gets promoted at the end of it, which is stupid. And Chris Pine is not young enough to pull off someone who would be young enough to be at Starfleet Academy. I have mixed feelings about the movie. It was entertaining, the special effects were fine, the acting was fine, the cinematography was fine, but the writing was just so terrible that it takes me out of the experience. And that's where it fails as a movie.
It certainly does overshadow the whole film. Really, almost the entire crew ends up together, in their respective positions no less, through a series of forced coincidences that defy logic. Chekov should only be 13 years old from what TOS established, yet he's somehow 17 in this timeline and already an ensign. Apparently he was a child prodigy for having gotten through the academy by 17, ahead of cadet Kirk... Did Chekov enroll when he was 14? Sulu is the helmsmen because some other guy happened to call out sick. Uhura gets on the Enterprise because of her relationship with Spock, then gets the communications officer job because of a transmission she intercepted that Kirk happened to overhear her talking about earlier, and because she can distinguish Romulan from Vulcan (although I really have to doubt the languages are anything alike after centuries evolving separately, or that it should matter with the universal translator). Also, why is she still at the academy? She has the rank of lieutenant when she is assigned to a ship, and she was enrolled in Starfleet before Kirk. Shouldn't she have graduated? Scotty happened to be on a planet (or moon of Vulcan given its proximity? despite Vulcan has no moon. Which reminds me, Discovery also shows a moon when they arrive at Vulcan/Ni'Var) Kirk gets marooned on, and with Prime Spock's (who also just so happened to be marooned there) help, perfects the transwarp beaming formula that makes spaceships irrelevant (one of the dumbest things in these films for how broken a plot device it is). Then he becomes chief engineer because.... reasons? I mean, the chief engineer the Enterprise had was killed earlier, but how would Scotty get the position over anyone who'd actually been assigned to the ship? Scotty essentially abandoned his post to go with Kirk for no apparent reason.

McCoy... actually makes sense. As I recall, they established he was already a doctor prior to joining Starfleet, which may have allowed him to automatically jump up a few ranks, despite enrolling at the same time as Kirk. And with the death of the chief medical officer on the Enterprise, naturally he would assume the role. Spock... I guess makes sense as well, given the absence of Pike's "Number One" in these films. Although, I kinda miss the inclusion of the Number One character. It would have made Spock seem a bit younger if he was still a Lt. Commander, and second officer under Number One.

It's an enjoyable popcorn flick, but it's so disappointing as a Star Trek movie, that like you, takes me out of the experience because of how poor the writing is.

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Sparky Prime
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Re: Star Trek

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Season 3 episode 8
Spoiler
Booker gets a distress call from his homeworld, which is deep in Emerald Chain territory. Discovery goes to help them out. Meanwhile, the leader of the Emerald Chain isn't happy about events from 2 episodes ago, and also heads to the planet looking to capture Booker and his Andorian friend. Discovery tries to keep the Federation/Starfleet neutral in the conflict by using Booker's ship to attack the Orion ship instead (which Book and Burnham can see clearly fighting from the planet's surface, like the ships are at a fairly low altitude, despite they're are actually in orbit and shouldn't appear to them as anything more than a tiny spec in the sky at best), but the Emerald Chain leader (rightfully) blames the Federation/Starfleet anyway.

They have also pinpointed the source of The Burn to a nebula, and there is a signal coming from the center of it, highly distorted, which turns out to be music they've all heard from various places since coming to the future (suggesting there might be something subliminal about it?). Saru is able to pick something out in the lower frequencies of the music, which they're able to identify as more distortion caused by a nearby neutron star. They're able to isolate the original signal which they're now able to identify as a Federation distress call. It'll take them a few hours to decode.

And meanwhile, they're able to convince Georgiou to get checked out as her blackouts seem to be getting worst. During the scans however, she has an episode, and starts to... "glitch out"? (I guess the Discovery writers saw "Into the Spiderverse")

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Sparky Prime
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Re: Star Trek

Post by Sparky Prime »

In the sneak peek for next weeks episode...
Spoiler
The mysterious character that debriefed Georgiou several episodes ago returns to talk to Dr. Culber about Georgiou's condition. He opens a classified file on a Betelgeusian time soldier named Yor (who is shown wearing an early TNG era uniform) from the temporal war. He explains they discovered time travel can make people sick, because molecules are designed to function in the era they're originally from and fight to return to where they belong (we saw in an episode of Voyager, using a temporal transporter too many times could cause temporal psychosis, but besides that, we've never heard of time travel making people sick in Star Trek). But Yor was also from a parallel universe "created by the temporal incursion of a Romulan mining ship" (so I guess they are aware of the Kelvin universe) that experienced effects similar to what Georgiou is going through now. Apparently the effect is a lot worst for individuals that have not only travelled through time, but crossed dimensions as well (so, why didn't it effect the Romulans and Spock when they ended up in the Kelvin universe when that was both a time travel and dimension crossing for them...?).

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Sparky Prime
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Re: Star Trek

Post by Sparky Prime »

Some tidbits from season 3 episode 9...
Spoiler
Part of the distress call from the origin of The Burn is revealed. It was a ship of Kelpiens who were investigating a possible dilithium nursery within the nebula when they became stranded. A ship was on its way to save them, but they never arrived and the Kelpiens hadn't heard anything since. With the ship still transmitting the distress call on a loop after all these years, Saru orders the crew to find out what's happening onboard, Stamets says they can use the prefix code to get access to the ships systems. Saru also decides not to inform the Admiral until they have more information.

Meanwhile, the Sphere Data points the crew to a planet with a 5% chance of curing Georgiou (how would the Sphere Data know this, and how come it doesn't offer up any details beyond 'go here to maybe cure her'? Also, apparently jumping to alternate universes was outlawed by the Temporal Accords along with time travel). They go, and in the middle of an empty field a man suddenly appears from no where named Carl (a character that doesn't give straight answers) dressed in Victorian era clothes reading a newspaper (which he says is tomorrows news with a headline that Georgiou is dead) and a door out in the middle of an empty field of snow. Georgiou goes through the door and the episode essentially becomes a Mirroruniverse episode, with Georgiou reliving events from her past. But she is able to alter events, this time around sparring mirror Burnham's life but kills mirror Stamets after their plot to kill her fails.

I think the writers are just stalling to drag out the plot at this point. It's odd to see investigating the Burn was the characters primary concern only a couple episodes ago, but now that they're actually making some headway, they've barely even touched upon the subject in the last two episodes. It also seems odd they're doing a two part Mirroruniverse episode at this point. How exactly is reliving/changing her past exactly supposed to cure Georgiou? And while characters with seemingly magical abilities isn't completely foreign to Star Trek.... Somehow they've managed to make that feel really out of place too.

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Sparky Prime
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Re: Star Trek

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Season 3 episode 10
Spoiler
Turns out "Carl" is actually the Guardian of Forever. He explains that during the Temporal Wars, people tried to use him to kill each other, so he moved to another planet to hide himself (and I guess can manifest himself in different ways now?). Burnham reasons only the Sphere Data with 1000 years of history and access to current Federation Databases could have extrapolated his new location (uh, ok, that's a weak explanation, and it doesn't explain why the Sphere Data would say there was a 5% chance it could cure her).

Georgiou is still dying after she returns from her experience in the mirror universe. "Carl" explains this was never supposed to cure her, he no longer just allows people to go back in time anymore. This experience was supposed to "weigh" her, to see if her time in this universe had changed her. Georgiou feels she failed this test, given she still ended up killing mirrorBurnham in the end, but "Carl" points out this time she tried for peace, and she saved a Kelpien who will go on to save many more. "Carl" gives her a second chance. Georgiou says she doesn't want to return to the mirror universe, but he explains he is just sending her back in time, to when the mirror universe and this universe were still aligned so she wont die from her molecules fighting to go back.

This also, unsurprisingly, contradicts TOS... When Kirk asked the Guardian if it could change the speed in which it showed them the past, it explained it was made to offer the past in that manner only, and couldn't change. Yet in Discovery, it is able to send Georgiou to a specific place in time, for which she could go through the portal whenever she was ready to? More than that, it doesn't even show a "preview" of where the time portal leads anymore, it's just a generic energy tunnel effect. It's also unclear what the mirror universe it'd sent Georgiou to was. "Carl" gave a vague answer about people having many different selves, and only offering that her biosensor having 3 months worth of data to indicate it actually happened, despite Burnham saying she never even left.

I gather they also altered the opening credit for this episode... Sorta. Remember the two mirror universe episodes from Enterprise with a military themed opening rather than the usual development of technology and exploration? Well this wasn't that. Discovery just inverted the colors and flipped everything upside down. I mean, on the one hand it's kinda nice they did something different, but on the other, it once again shows how lazy these creators are by doing the least amount of work.

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Re: Star Trek

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Episode 11
Spoiler
Discovery finally goes to the nebula to investigate the origins of The Burn. While the original crew would be long dead by now, Saru believes the captain was pregnant when she sent the distress call (apparently what other crewmembers took to be radiation burns on her face just so happens to also be a sign a Kelpien is pregnant), whose child may still be alive after 100 years....

The away team finds a damaged holographic environment, (one of the holograms has elements from all sorts of different Starfleet uniforms before shorting out, it also makes Burnham look like a Trill, the Doctor looks like a Bajoran, and Saru looks human... for some reason. How is all of this even still working after 100 years with no maintenance and all the while degrading from the radiation?) on the crashed ship on a Y class planet. There they find Su’Kal, a simple minded Kelpien (I guess because he was raised by malfunctioning holograms. And shouldn't he be well over 100 if that's when The Burn happened? He seems no older than Saru) and doesn't understand people coming from outside world.

The crew suspects Su'Kal has survived because the radiation in the nebula/planet mutated him in the womb. There is also some sort of monster that is a holographic manifestation of Su'Kal's fears, and when he becomes stressed out enough, Su'Kal emits an energy pulse... that destabilizes dilithium. He is the source of The Burn (how does this make any sense? Mutant or not, how can a person emit an energy pulse like that? Why does it seem to only effect dilithium specifically. How can that pulse encompass the entire galaxy within seconds? And he hasn't gotten upset like that again in the past 100 years?)

Discovery is revealed to have a cloaking device (I guess at some point the Treaty of Algeron became null after the fall of the Romulan Empire) which they use when the Emerald Chain arrives. But they are disabled when the energy pulse from Su'Kal hits them, Book goes to save the away team in his ship but Discovery to be captured by the Orions.

The name of this episode was originally "The Citadel", but they renamed it "Su'Kal".

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Re: Star Trek

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Episode 12
Spoiler
The Emerald Chain ship attacks the captured Discovery on the way to Federation HQ (because apparently the spore drive on Discovery can jump another ship along with it. Wouldn't that have come in handy before? Why is this the first time we've seen them spore jump with another ship?). Although the Admiral is suspicious, he has no choice but to open the shields to allow Discovery in. Meanwhile, Michael and Booker on his ship use a transwarp corridor (which seems more like the Vaadwaur Underspace corridors at this point, the corridors are full of debris from destroyed ships... Not sure why. Also not sure if I've mentioned this before, but Book's ship is capable of "morphing" as they call it, which means it can separate into several pieces and forms different configurations briefly to navigate obstacles it wouldn't be able to in its normal configuration. It's a cool idea, but it seems impractical for what is already a pretty small ship... And it wouldn't really need this function if it wasn't designed sorta like a B-Wing from Star Wars) to return to HQ only mere minutes after Discovery (isn't the spore drive instantaneous? Even through transwarp, how do they arrive only a few minutes later?) and crash into the Discovery shuttlebay just before the ship enters the shields (odd how Booker's ship got knocked down to a planet when Burnham ran into him at the start of the season, yet the past couple episodes, all sorts of debris has hit his ship causing no damage what so ever).

Surprisingly, Osyraa wants to negotiate uniting the Emerald Chain with the Federation. While the Admiral is open to the idea, he wants Osyraa to stand trial for her crimes, which she refuses to do of course. (Also, during their negotiations, they have a conversation about how replicated food is made from reprocessed waste, broken down to an atomic level to remake it into something else... pretty sure that's how Enterprise explained recycling waste back in the 22nd century, while in the 24th century TNG explained the replicator system as more complex than that, being able to turn matter to energy and vise versa. The Admiral also points out he's never had a real apple, despite having a flying rain forest parked at HQ, not to mention, we have seen starships with hydroponics and arboretums... and yet the ALIEN apparently has had a real apple to know it doesn't taste like the real thing? Also, shouldn't Osyraa already know how replicators work? Why does the Admiral need to explain it to her? And, being the 32nd century, I find it hard to believe the replicators haven't improved on getting the flavors of foods right. Even in the 24th century, Sisko said food from a replicator tasted fine to him, and he was known to cook with real ingredients that he grew himself on occasion)

Burnham goes "Die Hard" (such as teasing the bad guys on the comm, loosing her shoes and having to run around barefoot) through the ship (sometimes forgetting she has a phaser, which materializes from a device on her sleeve. I mean, she puts someone in a sleeper hold and gets stabbed in the leg in the process. Then she pulls out the knife and after crawling down a Jefferies tube while bleeding to death, finally uses the phaser to cauterize the wound... instead of getting a dermal regenerator. Why do all of that when she could have just shot the guy?) and frees Stamets by putting him in a forcefield and detonating a phaser next to a window, blowing him into space, allowing Federation HQ to tractor him inside. He's not happy about this however, once he learns Hugh and Adira (whom Stamets apparently considers to be his child all of a sudden, as he tells one of the Orion scientists trying to figure out the Spore Drive) were left behind in the nebula, and he wants to go rescue them before the radiation kills them (Saru, Hugh and Adira don't appear at all in this episode. You'd think there'd be at least one scene to remind the audience, showing us their health is deteriorating. But no, they just have some dialog telling us about it rather than showing it). The bridge crew also escape (apparently mores code is taught in the first year of the academy... despite always being mentioned as antiquated whenever it has come up before in Star Trek that usually some history buff member of the crew just happens to know) and find out the Sphere data has downloaded into 3 of the the Dot23 droids (which apparently come in the 3 Starfleet division colors, gold, blue and red... So does this mean they carry out different functions based on these colors? We've only seen them making repairs to the ships, why would they need them color coded for every department?) which intends on helping them retake the ship.

Yet another episode to have a late title change... Originally titled "The Good of the People" was renamed to "There is a Tide..."

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Sparky Prime
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Re: Star Trek

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CBS has posted some "concept art" (looks more like finished renders to me but whatever) for several of the 32nd century Federation Starships. Some of which gives us our first good looks at the ships, since the show itself hasn't....

Don't really like that the Voyager-J is an "Intrepid Class". It doesn't make sense for this completely different ship design, hundreds of years later, to also be called an Intrepid class. It really should be a new class name, or at the very least have something in the name to distinguish it from the 24th century Intrepid class ship.

Unfortunately, the "Constitution class" (same problem as the "Intrepid") is not among the ships shown, which I was hoping to get a good look at.

I also have to say... I don't like most of these ship designs. Hundreds of years later and new technologies, it makes sense the design aesthetics would change... But I feel for the most part they are too big of a departure from the design lineage we've seen for Starfleet. Even the 29th century USS Relativity that we saw in Voyager, while different aesthetically, still looked like it fit with the design linage we were familiar with, a natural evolution of starship design. But these designs look random, even compared to each other. This USS Maathai for example... It's literally an enclosed forest. There's no discernable nacelles or propulsion. It looks more like a space station, not a starship. I also don't understand why some of these ships aren't in one piece.... They mention in the show the detached nacelles is supposed to make the ship more efficient and maneuverable... although they fail to explain how that makes any sense (and Discovery's nacelles still reattach when they spore jump, I assume they do when at warp as well, although we haven't seen the ship use conventional warp drive since the upgrades). The USS Le Guin seems to take that a step further with the entire engineering hull separated from the primary hull. How does that help ship efficiency and maneuverability? How do they even power both hulls of the ship when I assume they still only have one warp core?

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Re: Star Trek

Post by andersonh1 »

I don't like them either, and I don't get the detached nacelles. How exactly is that supposed to work?

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Re: Star Trek

Post by Shockwave »

They're terrible. But I did like U.S.S. Nog, Eisenberg Class. That's kinda cool.

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